Science

Where To Watch Solar Eclipse 2016 on March 8-9

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This year?s only total Solar Eclipse will only be visible from Indonesia. On Mar. 9, the moon will position itself exactly in the middle of the Earth and the Sun creating a stunning natural phenomenon called the Solar Eclipse. Only Indonesian islands will be able to view it directly from their eyes on the islands of Sumatra, Borneo, Sulawesi and Micronesia.

But, in this age of live streaming, no phenomenon is too far away from our eyes. Thanks to technology, anyone on Earth can witness the event live on 1:00 AM GMT through a webcast. You can catch the webcast live on NASA TV or Exploratorium.edu.

If you?re lucky enough to be in Indonesia at the time of the event, it is highly advised to avoid looking at the Eclipse directly as harmful rays emanating from the phenomenon can harm your retina. Some protective goggles or a pinhole camera is your best bet if you want to observe the Solar Eclipse.

The Solar Eclipse is a rare phenomenon because our Moon?s eclipse is not a perfectly round orbit. It is slightly tilted at more than 5 degrees to the Earth?s orbit around the sun.

Solar Eclipse?s are important because they give scientists the chance to study the Sun?s outermost layer, which usually can?t be observed because of the Sun?s brightness. So a Total Eclipse is an important phenomenon for the world of astronomy.

How to watch the Solar Eclipse Safely:

  1. Wearing Sunglasses is not going to help you escape from the Sun?s harmful U.V rays.
  2. Build a Pinhole Camera. It will project the Solar Eclipse on a paper. You will need: A long cardboard box, a sheet of white paper, some aluminium foil, a craft knife, scissors, a drawing pin, duct tape and glue.
  3. You can use Binoculars to build a Pinhole camera.
  4. Don?t look directly at the Sun

A Solar Eclipse is a rare phenomenon, so make sure you don?t miss out and catch our Moon and the Sun coming together as one for a few minutes.

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