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Five Titanfall Alternatives You Should Play

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image courtesy of titanfall.com

Respawn Entertainment?s Titanfall has once again set the boundaries for gaming and first-person shooter gameplay. Who wouldn?t get hooked to this game? Giant robots, parkour gunmen?it?s like every little boy?s dream.?This game appeals greatly to little boys who dream of riding giant Gundams or flying warplanes that transform into giant Valkyries.

If you?re one of those that played mech games like Super Robot Taisen or Dynasty Warriors Gundam and loved it, then you should take a look at these games. While these aren?t exactly Titanfall-class games in terms of graphics and gameplay, some of these are labeled as classics. They are worth taking a look at, especially if you?re looking for a game that will tide over your wait for the arrival of Titanfall?s various patches and such.

So here are five titles, some of which hardcore mech gamers out there will surely recognize. Let?s start off with a classic title:

Titanfall alternatives?

  1. MechWarrior 4: Vengeance

Released: 2000

image courtesy of wikimedia.org

image courtesy of wikimedia.org

– This game was inspired hugely by FASA?s BattleTech universe, a board game that borrowed designs heavily from mech titles such as Macross and other anime. If you?re starting out playing mechs, you should give this game a look, since it is highly regarded as a can?t-miss game for mech enthusiasts. This game puts you in the cockpit of a mech, or a robot, in a 31st century battlefield. While fans argue that classics like MechWarrior 2 are better titles, MechWarrior 4 is still a nice addition to the MechWarrior series because of its options that provide more customization to the mech. With its introduction of multiplayer modes accompanying its campaign mode, MechWarrior 4 still remains widely received than MechWarrior Online.

 

  1. Hawken

Released: 2012 (full release in 2014)

image courtesy of wikimedia.org

image courtesy of wikimedia.org

– Hawken is the only title in this discussion that at least can hold a candle to Titanfall in terms of graphics and gameplay. Still in open-beta for at least a year and a half, this free-to-play online multiplayer is your classic mech game: slow, simple, and it?s all about waging war while riding a mech. Hawken?s appeal also lies in realism. In real life, robots aren?t supposed to be sleek machines; they are heavy, clunky, and are hard to steer and maneuver, so things like aiming, moving, and techniques are more purposeful.

 

  1. Front Mission 4

Released: 2003

image courtesy of wikimedia.org

image courtesy of wikimedia.org

– Front Mission was the make or break game of Square Enix, simply because it introduced a gameplay that wasn?t seen in mech games before. Square Enix used the tactical battle approach they used in tactical RPG titles like Final Fantasy Tactics. In this game, players use action points for various gameplay elements like attacks and movements to finish objectives and in-game goals. The game has an elaborate storyline much like other titles like Armored Core, and it spans over a series of titles and not just one game. After a poor reception of their Front Mission 3 title, Front Mission 4 returned to the tried-and-tested formula of tactical gameplay.

 

  1. MechAssault

Released: 2002

image courtesy of wikimedia.org

image courtesy of wikimedia.org

– Another entry featuring the BattleTech universe, MechAssault was instrumental in catapulting the then-emerging Xbox Live network into full prominence. It featured capabilities we now enjoy in online multiplayer, including voice chat. This game featured a more interactive environment than ?other mech titles at the expense of full customization for the player?s mech. Curiously, that worked, since more players seemingly preferred seeing the destruction wrought upon by their mech rather than calculating how much damage their gatling gun can do before overheating.

 

  1. Steel Battalion

Released: 2001

image courtesy of wikimedia.org

image courtesy of wikimedia.org

– If you want to talk about complexity and the complicated gameplay of mech games, then this game takes the cake. When it was released, Steel Battalion players had to buy a $200 peripheral cockpit complete with two joysticks, three foot pedals, and 40 buttons, or else they wouldn?t get the full experience of the game. Here?s why; back then, there were entire roomfuls of Xboxes during game expos, where ?drill sergeants? briefed players about the missions and the capabilities of their mechs. While it might?ve been viewed as ridiculous, it was endearing at the same time, if you imagine it as a life-and-death situation where most of the pilots ?wouldn?t be coming back?. This game really took simulation seriously. If you die without hitting the ?Eject? button, your save file is automatically erased.

 

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