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Apple and Samsung back in U.S. court over $2-B worth of patent infringement

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After winning another mobile patent case versus Samsung Electronics Co. just last Apple-Samsungweek, Apple and Samsung head to U.S. court over $2-B worth of patent infringement trial today.

From The Bitbag?s news posted last week, Apple is seeking up to $40 per unit or a total of $2 billion in damages against Samsung if it would be found that Samsung is guilty of infringing all five of Apple?s software patents, namely: autocomplete, data synchronization, phone-number tapping, slide to unlock, and search functions while Samsung wants $7 million from Apple for alleged infringement of two of its patents.

In today?s trial, the current issues say, Apple claims that Samsung stole a tap-from-search technology that allows someone searching for a telephone number or address on the Web to tap on the results to call the number or put the address into a map and the ?Slide to Unlock,? which allows users to swipe the face of their smartphone to use it while Samsung countered that Apple is stealing a wireless technology system that speeds up sending and receiving data.

Moreover, before this trial, Samsung objected about Apple?s plan of showing a video to the jurors to explain the basics of the US patent system but said objection was dismissed by the court.

In a statement, Samsung said, “Because Apple’s alleged innovation is a central disputed issue in this trial, it would be highly prejudicial to Samsung to show the jury – before any evidence is introduced – an official instructional video that depicts Apple products in such a context.”

It could be remembered that a month ago, Apple Inc. and Samsung Electronics Co. failed to reach an agreement over today?s patent dispute even though there had been a mediation process.

Google backs up Samsung

With Apple Inc. and Samsung on trial over patents, Google backs up and defends Samsung.

Reports said Samsung and Google both asserted that Google had been working on this particular technology before Apple filed its patents. Apple?s objections on the Samsung devices are actually part of Google?s Android operating system which is by far the most popular mobile operating system worldwide.

Reports also said that to help defend Samsung, Google engineers are expected to take the stand to defeat Apple?s contentions. Andy Rubin, the former head of Google’s mobile business who oversaw the development of Android and who worked for Apple from 1989 to 1992 is listed as a potential witness. Last week?s news also revealed that Samsung plans to call Google’s VP of engineering Hiroshi Lockheimer, and Todd Pendleton, Samsung’s marketing chief for its U.S. telecoms division to the stand.

Many believe that once Apple wins, Google would have to make changes to critical Android features, and Samsung and other Android phone makers might have to modify the software on their phones.

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