Video Games

Obsidian Doesn?t Want to Rely on Kickstarter for Pillars of Eternity Sequel

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image courtesy of eternity.obsidian.net

After an unfortunate delay of its release, Pillars of Eternity developers, Obsidian Entertainment, is under pressure to finish the game. Originally scheduled last April, the release of Pillars was estimated to be moved later this year. Rightly so, this was due to the developers adding extra content which was promised after reaching their stretch goals in their Kickstarter campaign 2 years ago.

Thanks to their campaign, the project, named ?Project Eternity,? was able to raise $3,986,929?this was more than triple of their initial target and the most of any video game campaign at that time. And with additional funding from other sources such as PayPal, this later on increased to around $4.1 million.

Yet despite the campaign?s success, Obsidian does not look to rely on Kickstarter in the future?particularly in the chance of a Pillars of Eternity sequel.

This is according to Obsidian?s project director, Josh Sawyer.

?That?s the dream of any independent developer,? he said in an interview with PCGamesN. ?That they get the cash reserves and that they don?t need to ask anybody for money.?

?What I would like, and this is true of any independent developer, is for this title and the expansion to be successful enough that we don’t have to go back to Kickstarter to make the sequel,? he said

While the end result was ?very rewarding,? Sawyer said the entire campaign process was very exhausting and time-consuming.

?That process is something I could never look forward to but the overall result of it can be very effective,? he said. ?I wouldn’t shy away from using it in the future if I thought here’s an idea for a game that a publisher’s not going to touch.?

However, Sawyer did not exclude the idea of turning back to Kickstarter if they need to.

?If we wanted to make a brand new game that?s ?very different, that, again, is something a publisher isn?t super jazzed about but individual backers would be, then, we?d probably go back to Kickstarter,? he explains.

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