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Mariana Trench Has A Mysterious Noise, Say Scientists

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Mariana Trench

Mariana Trench has a mysterious noise. The latest experiment by the scientists has discovered a shocking fact that a lot of noise is coming out from the ocean floor.

ABC has reported that researchers tried an underwater microphone called hydrophone to record the ambient noise in Challenger Deep, Mariana Trench near Micronesia. The hydrophone has recorded the different kinds of sound from more than 10,000 metres below the surface. Generally, everyone has an idea that seafloor is quiet. But the latest experiment is all set to disapprove that notion.

?You would think that the deepest part of the ocean would be one of the quietest places on Earth. Yet there really is almost constant noise from both natural and man-made sources,? said ?Robert Dziak, a NOAA research oceanographer and chief scientist on the project. ?The ambient sound field at Challenger Deep is dominated by the sound of earthquakes, both near and far was well as the distinct moans of baleen whales and the overwhelming clamor of a category 4 typhoon that just happened to pass overhead,? he added. ?

The present project is sponsored by NOAA office of Ocean Exploration and Research. Oregon State University and the US Coast Guard have joined hands with NOAA for this study. Its objective is to find out the reason behind the ambient noise in the deepest sides of the Pacific Ocean. They project will help the scientists to understand the increase in the noise levels. Now, Scientists are enthusiastic to carry the project further. ?We had never put a hydrophone deeper than a mile or so below the surface, so putting an instrument down some seven miles into the ocean was daunting,? Haru Matsumoto, an Oregon State ocean engineer said. ?We had to drop the hydrophone mooring down through the water column at no more than about five meters per second. Structures don?t like rapid change and we were afraid we would crack the ceramic housing outside the hydrophone.? he added. According to Newsweek, the next phase of the study will begin in 2017. Scientists will use the deep-sea camera to capture images along with hydrophone. Will this project help in predicting the earthquake as well as other natural threatning disasters?

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